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An Introduction to UHF RFID

The latest standardization of the Ultra-High Frequency RFID spectrum is the GS1 UHF Gen2 protocol (ISO/IEC 18000-63), which defines the technical specifications (e.g., physical/logical interactions between devices, anti-collision algorithms, security commands, etc.) for RFID devices operating in the frequency of 860–860 MHz. The ITU designated UHF (Ultra-High Frequency) as the radio frequency range of 300 MHz to 3 GHz, while the IEEE defines UHF as only frequencies between 300 MHz and 1 GHz (the rest of the ITU–defined UHF frequency range overlaps with the IEEE’s frequency allocations for the L band and

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RFID Terminology

Active Tag: A battery-powered RFID tag that powers the circuitry that transmits the signal to a reader. Active tags differ from passive tags in that they have longer read ranges, a higher price tag, and a larger size (due to the battery). Antenna: The element built into both RFID readers and tags that radiates and receives radio energy. Automatic Identification (also called automatic data capture): The ability to collect and enter data directly into computer systems without human involvement through technologies such as barcodes, biometrics, RFID, and voice recognition. Backscatter:

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The Difference Between the RFID Frequency Ranges (LF/HF/UHF)

The frequency range of an RFID system has a significant impact on multiple performance metrics like the read range and interference susceptibility, so it’s important to make sure you select the right frequency for your business application or use case.    LF/NFC HF UHF Frequency range 125 – 134.2 KHz 13.56 MHz (global) 433, 865 – 828 MHz (varies regionally) Read range < 10 cm < 1 m 1 – 100 m Tag cost Relatively expensive Varies Inexpensive (in high volumes) Reader cost Relatively inexpensive (established technology) Relatively inexpensive (established technology) More expensive

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The Difference Between Active and Passive RFID Tags

The primary difference between active and passive tags is that active tags have their own power source (typically an embedded battery) and passive tags rely on the RFID reader’s propagation signal to power the tag. From this primary distinction stems a variety of considerations to make when deciding between the two types of tags. This article aims to help aid you in deciding which type of tag — active or passive — is best for your business application by laying out some of the most pivotal factors you should consider.   Active

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How Does An RFID System Work?

In its most rudimentary form, an RFID system is made up of two parts; a transponder (a tag) and an interrogator (a reader). The transponder, which consists of an inlay which has a microchip, an antenna, and usually a substrate (the stuff that holds the tag’s components together) and optionally an encasing to protect the inlay from various environmental factors, is encoded with information specific to the object it is attached to or associated with, such as a serial number. The interrogator reads the transponder’s information by emitting a signal to the transponder

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WiSnap WiFi connection to PC using COM-TCP Redirector

This page demonstrates how a COM-to-TCP connection can be made from a PC to the WiSnap RS232 adapter. The first step is to install the Null-modem emulator (com0com) application, which installs and works as a driver for a pair (or many pairs) of virtual COM ports. You can download the com0com installer HERE. You can create as many pairs of virtual COM port as you like, and use any pair to connect one application to another. The COM port pairs will be given names starting at CNCA0 and CNCB0. These

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Configure software Access Point (AP) mode on WiSnap adapters

To configure the WiSnap adapter for software access point mode follow the below steps: 1. Connect the WiSnap adapter to your PC using a USB-RS232 cable. 2. Configure your terminal application (PuTTY, TeraTerm, etc.) with the settings: 9600 baud 8 data bits 1 stop bit no parity no flow control 3. Start the terminal application. 4. Type the following commands followed by a carriage return (enter key): $$$ – should see a CMD response and the green LED will begin blinking quickly set wlanssid – sets the SSID of the WiSnap when

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How to use Android Wi-Fi AP to tether the WiSnap to a cellular network

This app note demonstrates how to connect the WiSnap RS-232 dongle via Wi-Fi to an Android AP (access point) that is connected to the internet via a 3G/4G cellular network. To clarify, we are going to set up the Android device (with access to a cellular network) as a Wi-Fi access point, then configure the WiSnap (via RS-232 connection and terminal application) to connect to the Android’s Wi-Fi access point. This way, the WiSnap will be able to connect to the Internet through the Android’s cellular network. Set up the

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How to setup the WiSnap RS-232 adapter

Select A Terminal Application Before we begin, it’s important that you make sure that you have a compatible terminal emulator installed on your computer. Here, at Serialio, we often use our product, JavaTerm. There are also a myriad of different terminal emulators (for Mac and Windows) that will do just fine. If you don’t know where to start,  we recommend YAT (Yet Another Terminal) for Windows and zTerm for Mac. Configure The Terminal  As many of you likely know, serial devices and the respective application/hardware used to communicate with them

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How to connect the BlueSnap Smart (BLE) to SerialMagic Professional for Windows

This article demonstrates how to connect the BlueSnap Smart Bluetooth Low Energy (4.0) to an RS-232 adapter to Windows using SerialMagic Professional. We have broken down this process into three steps: (1) Pair through Windows Bluetooth, (2) Pair through SerialMagic Professional, and (3) Start the connection. This tutorial will only work after yACK BLE has been used to set up the BlueSnap Smart to be able to pair with Windows 10. If you haven’t already done so, click here. Pair via Windows 10 Bluetooth Settings 1. Power on your BlueSnap Smart

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