RFID-NFC Hardware Support

 

RFID-NFC Hardware Support

 

 

This support page shows how to configure the idChamp RS3 to read 48-bit HID Corporate 1000 cards. For a more in-depth (albeit, less specific) guide on using the pcProx Configuration Utility to configure the idChamp RS3 or RS4, refer to this page.
Navigate to the Serial Device Manager (SDM) . Tap on the options menu button (the three vertical dots button at the top right-hand corner of the SDM view). Select Connect BLE via NFC chip . This brings you to the NFC Connect view (see image below). Place the NFC chip beneath the Android device's NFC sensor. The SDM will use the data on the NFC chip to immediately pair with the scanner (no Bluetooth discovery necessary)...
1. Launch iScanBrowser, Cloud-In-Hand Mobile Grid, or SerialMagic Gears. 2. Navigate to the Serial Device Manager (SDM) . 3. Power on your RS4 and add it As a connection to the SDM. 4. Once the RS4 is connected, tap on the gear icon (located to the far-right of the Bluetooth name). 5. Tap on RS4 CSN/PACS Credential Type . 6. Select HID 37-bit/40-bit/iClass CSN .
This support page shows how to configure the idChamp RS3 to read 40-bit HID Prox cards on engine #1 and any 37-bit HID Prox cards on engine #2.
This support page shows how to configure the idChamp RS3 to read 37-bit HID Prox cards on engine #1 and any bit-count HID iClass CSN cards on engine #2.
This page provides definitions for commonly used RFID terms.
What is UHF? The latest standardization of the Ultra-High Frequency RFID spectrum is the GS1 UHF Gen2 protocol (ISO/IEC 18000-63 ) , which defines the technical specifications (e.g. physical/logical interactions between devices, anti-collision algorithms, security commands, etc.) for RFID devices operating in the frequency of 860–860 MHz . The ITU designated UHF (Ultra-High Frequency) as the radio frequency range of 300 MHz to 3 GHz , while the IEEE defines UHF as only frequencies between 300 MHz and 1 GHz (the rest of the ITU–defined UHF frequency range overlaps with the IEEE...
Frequently asked questions related to RFID (including NFC and UHF) hardware and solutions.
Inlay The tag inlay consists of the integrated circuit (IC) , an antenna, and a substrate to hold it all together. The inlay, on its own, is a fully functional tag; ready to be packaged into either a smart label or another casing. Integrated Chip (IC) The IC is an electronic circuit or microchip that is manufactured at a semiconductor plant. This microchip contains a memory store and a microprocessor or decision making (logic) unit. The IC is configured either as a passively powered device (powered by inductive coupling generated from another self-powered device) or as an actively powered...
There are a handful of factors that can affect RFID, NFC, or UHF tag read ranges. If you're interested in improving the read range of your RFID application or use case, continue reading! Tag Characteristics Inlay Size — As a rule of thumb, the bigger the tag inlay, the longer the read range. Of course, it is important to remember that the variation of read ranges determined by the tag inlay size is within the constraints of the tag type (e.g. NFC, UHF) and frequency (e.g. HF, LF, UHF). Tag Placement — Tag placement can make a huge different on the read range of the tag. For...
Decoding the Different Types of RFID There are many different ISO standards, protocols, and physical differences between various RFID tag types. Choosing compatible readers and tags can be tricky, especially for an RFID novice. For the purposes of this explanation, we’ll only focus on passive RFID, specifically, Low-Frequency (LF), High-Frequency (HF), Near Field Communication (NFC), and NFC Data Exchange Format (NDEF). For a little bit of background, here are some examples of how each type of RFID tag is used. Passive RFID examples: ♦ Employee and / or Student Access control...
NFC, or near field communication, is an exceedingly popular technology for a wide reach of applications—including access control, payments, information exchange, and automation. This series of articles serves to provide our customers with a information regarding what NFC is, the various types of NFC tag types, and the applications of NFC—or in other words, a practical guide to NFC. Click on the titles below to learn more. About Near Field Communication Common Types of NFC Tags Applications of Near Field Communication...
There are many, many applications for NFC technology — from the chip embedded in your credit card to streamlining other technologies, such as Bluetooth pairing. The combination of close-range data transfer, ease of use, and versatility make NFC perfect for environments where data transactions have a requirement for location-specific access (for example, you don't want your credit card chip to be accessible from more than a few centimeters away). Below are some of the most common uses for NFC (note that this is far from an all-inclusive list). Common Use Cases Identity Validation/...
Although NFC is a subgroup of RFID technology, there are many varieties of NFC tags/inlays to choose from for different solution needs. This page is a summary guide showing common NFC inlay and tag type options available for many common RFID solution & application needs. This article is a part of the series of articles intended as a practical guide to NFC serving to address many common considerations when selecting an NFC tag type for your unique application or solution. Clarification — "NFC tag," as used in this series of articles, refers to any implementation of passive...
NFC is an acronym for Near Field Communication. NFC is a fairly recent 'labeling' for a subset of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) for short-range, wireless protocols. While NFC type RFID can apply to low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), and ultra-high frequency (UHF) types, it's most commonly associated with HF and used for close-range applications (hence the "near field"). NFC has some features that distinguish it from other forms of RFID, such as the capacity for bidirectional peer-to-peer communication. This article, An Introduction to NFC, is part of a...
RFID tags are composed of several components—a micro-chip, a substrate (e.g., Mylar or plastic coating), and an antenna, which is attached to the micro-chip. The primary difference between active and passive RFID tags is that active tags incorporate a built-in power supply, while passive tags use the power from the electromagnetic wave from the RFID reader to send its data to the reader. Apart from this primary distinction, you'll find more in-depth differences in the table below. Active Tags Passive Tags Power Powered by internal source (e.g., battery or solar cell) Rely on the...
This article demonstrates how to use iOS's build-in NFC reader (made available to 3 rd party applications in iOS 11) with Cloud-In-Hand ® Mobile Grid. While the native NFC reader is useful in absence of a RFID/NFC reader, such as the idChamp ™ RS3, it's important to note that there are some limitations to the native iOS NFC reader; it can only read the NDEF data stored on the NFC tag and it cannot write any data to the NFC tag . For more functionality, such as reading various data stores of the RFID/NFC tag and writing to RFID/NFC tags, we recommend the idChamp ™ RS4...
Anti-metal tags are specialized RFID tags that can be read from conductive surfaces, such as metal (something that regular tags can't do). The Problem Before you understand the problem, you need to understand how RFID tags work — When an RFID reader scans a tag, it sends a radio-frequency electromagnetic field that powers the tag (passive tags) and allows the RFID reader to communicate with the tag. The problem arises when the RFID tag is fixed to a conductive surface, such a s metal. The conductive surface alters the electromagnetic field created by the RFID reader so that the RFID...
This support article demonstrates how to remove keystroke delimiters from the idChamp™ RS3 Dual Engine RFID Reader with the RS3-NFC Setup application for iOS . This tutorial assumes that you have already installed the RS3-NFC Setup application for iOS. If you have not already done so, please do so now. Adjust the DIP Switches for BLE Mode You must set the idChamp™ RS3's DIP switches to BLE mode in order to adjust the configuration with the RS3-NFC Setup application for iOS. To see how to do this, click here . Once the RS3 is in BLE mode, you can continue to the next section of...
This article defines the meanings of the various LED patterns and beep sequences on the Scanfob ® NFC-BB2 and Scanfob ® Ultra-BB2. LED Patterns for Actions Action Function LEDs Displayed LED Sequence Beep Sequence Hold down center button for 1 second Power On Click center button once Scan Hold down center button for 2 seconds Power Off Plug into USB Battery Charging Hold down center button for 6 seconds Factory Reset LED Patterns for Statuses Status LEDs Displayed LED Sequence Beep Sequence Off On Tag Found Bluetooth Transmission of Tag ID Low Battery Critically Low Battery Bluetooth...
How do the NFC-BB2i, NFC-BB2, and NFC-BB2e differ? NFC-BB2i NFC-BB2 NFC-BB2e Notes Bluetooth SPP Yes Yes No Uses SerialMagic Bluetooth HID No Yes No Works on iOS like a keyboard Made for iOS (MFi) Yes No No Requires special iOS app to use this mode* Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) No No Yes Requires special app to use this mode*
MFi is Apple's licensing program for hardware and software specific to their iDevices . MFi , or Made for iOS (iPod/iPhone/iPad), in hardware like the Scanfob ® 3002i denotes a special Bluetooth connection mode called IAP . IAP is similar to SPP on Android — which allows a peripheral device to connect as a virtual COM port. This capability allows software developers to interface peripherals directly with their apps. Simulating a virtual COM port means that scans are sent faster and more reliably. Simulated COM ports have the additional benefit of being able to send special...
The table below provides a list of MFi (Made for iOS) certified scanners sold by Serialio.com. Barcode Scanners RFID Readers Sleds & All-In-One Units Scanfob ® 3002i Scanfob ® NFC-BB2i Honeywell Captuvo Sled Scanfob ® 4000i Scanfob ® Ultra-BB2i Olli Sled Scanfob ® 2002i Scanfob ® qID Mini iAP KDC 4000i Sled KDC 20i idChamp™ 1128 KDC 200i KDC 300i KDC 350i Socket 7Ci Socket 7Xi Socket 7Di For a comprehensive list of all MFi certified devices, contact our sales team...
This knowledge base article aims to provide general information regarding the various data transfer methods used by barcode and RFID readers.

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